Film Review: Grown Ups

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Grown Ups is explosively funny, unforgettable and comedy gold. Fans of Adam Sandler films believe that this is one of his best films ever, even though there is some crude humou in there. Grown Ups doesn’t disappoint and it gives us a strong, memorable message: that family is the most important thing.

Co-writer Sandler, who plays Lenny, has created the greatest dad, sometimes a bumbling husband, but a character with a great heart. Lenny is no perfect dad or husband, nor is he obsessed with riches. He may be self-centred and craves attention from his wife, but his main concern is keeping his childhood friends close and making fun memories with his family. This is what makes great comedy and what makes Grown Ups a feel-good film.

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After their high school basketball coach passes away, five good high school friends and former teammates reunite for a Fourth of July holiday weekend. Can the outdoors help these grown-ups rediscover close connections, or is this chaos in the making?

In Grown Ups, Dickie is the main antagonist and Lenny’s arch-nemesis, with a grievance with each other that dates right back to their high school days. Dickie seeks revenge on Lenny in Grown Ups, though it is shown that Dickie is ultimately getting too big for his boots. He’s always there to make Lenny feel intimated and pressure him into looking stupid.

At its best, Grown Ups is enjoyable, good-hearted, grin-at-your-mates funny. The beauty of this film is that you get a proper good laugh out of it.

Some of the funniest scenes in this film take place in the cabin. Each character has a subplot building, including Marcus (David Spade), who sleeps on the sofa as Lenny and Eric (Kevin James) mess with Marcus in his sleep about his love for Gloria (Joyce Patten).

With Grown Ups, you get the best of both worlds – a relaxed and yet hysterical comedy with an outstanding cast. What’s not to love?

By Lauren W, a student at St Thomas More Catholic School