Punished for not Misbehaving

Every kid who has never been in serious trouble will have at one point in their life pondered what it must be like to be “one of those kids”. You know the type. The kids that throw things around, shout at teachers and spend 90% of their school day standing outside of a classroom.

We’ve all felt that panic when being put in a seating plan at school, praying that you won’t be sat next to that boy who steals pencil cases and shoves water bottles down his pants. We’ve all felt that devastation when you realise that you have to spend a year with that girl who you can never tell if she’s being nice to you or if you’re being made fun of.

Unfortunately, this article is no beacon of hope to the studious or simply just considerate people. The truth is that in this day and age in the United Kingdom, your school days are somewhat hellish if you’re one of the good kids. Why? Because the naughty ones get everything.

Some of us will remember that moment of sheer disgust in primary school when the most badly behaved boy in the year gets football tickets just because he hasn’t thrown a chair at anyone for a week.

There are schools that give away trips to Disney Land Paris to frequent skivers just for turning up to school for one full term. What about the ones who turn up every day and have done since Year 7?

Some schools give away tablets if a child’s behaviour improves. What about the students who consistently have good behaviour? Where’s their iPad?

It is incomprehensible to most people why people are rewarded for turning over a new leaf when there are others who cause the school no problems and just cooperate with staff. Maybe, the head teacher should think about giving a “special award” to that boy who got an A in both work ethic and behaviour on his school report. The girl who is always pleasant to be around should really be sitting on her brand new Samsung Galaxy Tab waiting patiently for Angry Birds to finish downloading while the boy who has made it a mere week in school without being caught with drugs should be saving up to buy one with his own money; not the school’s.